Discussion:
Packet Driver
(too old to reply)
Thomas D. Dean
2011-07-18 02:11:55 UTC
Permalink
I want to install WATTCP on my FreeDOS system.

I have a Linksys Wireless-G Notebook Adapter Model WPC54G Ver. 3.1

I have wat2001b.zip. I think I need a packet driver. Correct?

Where may I find a driver for FreeDOS? Google returns too many results
to be meaningful.

tomdean
c***@aol.com
2011-07-18 02:53:12 UTC
Permalink
tomdean,

Yes, you need a packet driver. However I'm not sure about running a wireless card under DOS - packet
drivers are typically not capable of configuring wireless security. They normally operate with a wired ethernet
port. Others will know more about this than I.

Is there a reason you are running on real hardware compared to a virtual machine?

Packet drivers can be found at one of two places:

1) www.crynwr.com - many of these are open source.
2) The web site of whoever makes the Ethernet interface of your PC. This driver will likely be
closed source.

What applications are you trying to run? If they are basic FTP, Telnet, etc. you may want to look
into mTCP as well.

Cordata






-----Original Message-----
From: Thomas D. Dean <***@speakeasy.org>
To: freedos-user <freedos-***@lists.sourceforge.net>
Sent: Sun, Jul 17, 2011 9:39 pm
Subject: [Freedos-user] Packet Driver


I want to install WATTCP on my FreeDOS system.

I have a Linksys Wireless-G Notebook Adapter Model WPC54G Ver. 3.1

I have wat2001b.zip. I think I need a packet driver. Correct?

Where may I find a driver for FreeDOS? Google returns too many results
to be meaningful.

tomdean
Thomas D. Dean
2011-07-18 02:56:33 UTC
Permalink
Post by Thomas D. Dean
I want to install WATTCP on my FreeDOS system.
I have a Linksys Wireless-G Notebook Adapter Model WPC54G Ver. 3.1
I have wat2001b.zip. I think I need a packet driver. Correct?
Where may I find a driver for FreeDOS? Google returns too many results
to be meaningful.
More info:

The adapter uses the Broadcom BCM4318 chip.

tomdean
Rugxulo
2011-07-18 03:13:45 UTC
Permalink
Hi,
Post by Thomas D. Dean
Post by Thomas D. Dean
I want to install WATTCP on my FreeDOS system.
I have a Linksys Wireless-G Notebook Adapter Model WPC54G Ver. 3.1
I have wat2001b.zip. I think I need a packet driver. Correct?
Where may I find a driver for FreeDOS? Google returns too many results
to be meaningful.
The adapter uses the Broadcom BCM4318 chip.
Eek! Okay, first of all, don't get your hopes up. Seriously, this
stuff is complex, and DOS support ain't great. Anyways ...

Try here (run NICSCAN.EXE, see what it says, grab a packet driver or
two or three, get mTCP, edit sample.cfg, run DHCP.EXE, try FTP.EXE,
etc. etc.).

http://www.georgpotthast.de/sioux/packet.htm

http://www.brutman.com/mTCP/
http://www.ibiblio.org/pub/micro/pc-stuff/freedos/files/distributions/1.0/pkgs/crynwrx.zip
http://www.ibiblio.org/pub/micro/pc-stuff/freedos/files/distributions/1.0/pkgs/crynwrs.zip
Thomas D. Dean
2011-07-18 05:21:41 UTC
Permalink
On Sun, 2011-07-17 at 22:13 -0500, Rugxulo wrote:
Using FreeBSD 8-STABLE, a kernel module is produced which is a driver
for the card.

I may be wrong in some of the following.

When building the kernel module, an executable, b43-fwcutter is used to
extract a binary portion of the driver provided by the manufacturer.
This is used as an interface between the FreeBSD kernel and the BCM4318
chip.

The command line is like: b43-fwcutter xxx.sys

FreeBSD uses the bwn driver as the interface between the TCP stack and
the chip. The bwn driver is a wrapper around the code extracted from
the windows(?) driver.

Now, I am REALLY getting over my head.

tomdean
Karen Lewellen
2011-07-18 16:00:16 UTC
Permalink
Just tossing in my two cents, but you require the dos driver for the card,
and there should be no reason why it will not work in freedos as they do
in other editions of dos.
I have one in my desktop and another in my laptop running pure dos and
using a driver from the card manufacturer, dlink in the first case com3 in
the second.
the wireless aspect might make a difference though? both of mine are for
wired setups.
Karen
Post by Thomas D. Dean
I want to install WATTCP on my FreeDOS system.
I have a Linksys Wireless-G Notebook Adapter Model WPC54G Ver. 3.1
I have wat2001b.zip. I think I need a packet driver. Correct?
Where may I find a driver for FreeDOS? Google returns too many results
to be meaningful.
tomdean
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Ralf A. Quint
2011-07-18 17:03:25 UTC
Permalink
Post by Karen Lewellen
the wireless aspect might make a difference though? both of mine are for
wired setups.
Karen
Yes, as someone already mentioned, this makes in fact all the difference!

It does not only take a(ny) packet driver for him to get working, it
would take additional software to deal with WEP/WPA encryption and
most importantly, the wireless setup and functionality like dealing
with SSID, channel, etc as well. That are all things that simply do
not apply in a wired setup...
DOS and packet drivers simply pre-date wireless networking, hence he
will simpy be SOL...

Ralf
Thomas D. Dean
2011-07-18 17:10:00 UTC
Permalink
The wireless network uses MAC address control.

tomdean
Mike Eriksen
2011-07-18 17:16:54 UTC
Permalink
Post by Thomas D. Dean
The wireless network uses MAC address control.
That's a complete waste of time. Every IP packet includes the senders
MAC address in clear text, so any school boy can get your MAC address
with a sniffer and use it in his own setup. It soo easy to fake IP
packages.

Mike
Post by Thomas D. Dean
tomdean
Thomas D. Dean
2011-07-18 17:32:31 UTC
Permalink
On Mon, 2011-07-18 at 19:16 +0200, Mike Eriksen wrote:

The network is in a semi-remote location - no kids! There is only one
other wireless network I can detect, with a marginal signal level.

The machine will provide a data stream that will not end the world if it
stops.

tomdean
Mike Eriksen
2011-07-18 17:34:47 UTC
Permalink
The network is in a semi-remote location - no kids!  There is only one
other wireless network I can detect, with a marginal signal level.
The machine will provide a data stream that will not end the world if it
stops.
So why bother in the first place?

Mike
tomdean
--
Operator of the Danish TS-O-Matic.
http://thinstation.org
- a light, full featured linux based thin client OS
Thomas D. Dean
2011-07-18 17:41:00 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mike Eriksen
Post by Thomas D. Dean
The network is in a semi-remote location - no kids! There is only one
other wireless network I can detect, with a marginal signal level.
The machine will provide a data stream that will not end the world if it
stops.
So why bother in the first place?
Just to annoy you.

tomdean
c***@aol.com
2011-07-18 17:38:52 UTC
Permalink
Tomdean,

I think it should be clear now that it isn't very likely your wireless adapter can
be directly controlled from DOS (Free or otherwise).

A workable solution would be to boot Windows or Linux on the PC in question and use
their wireless card drivers, then boot FreeDOS in a virtual machine. The virtual machine
simulates a wired Ethernet interface which is no problem to bridge onto the PC's wireless
network adapter.

Is there any reason why this solution wouldn't work?

Is there a specific reason why you are trying to boot onto real hardware?

Cordata








-----Original Message-----
From: Thomas D. Dean <***@speakeasy.org>
To: Mike Eriksen <***@gmail.com>
Cc: freedos-user <freedos-***@lists.sourceforge.net>
Sent: Mon, Jul 18, 2011 12:33 pm
Subject: Re: [Freedos-user] Packet Driver


On Mon, 2011-07-18 at 19:16 +0200, Mike Eriksen wrote:



The network is in a semi-remote location - no kids! There is only one

other wireless network I can detect, with a marginal signal level.



The machine will provide a data stream that will not end the world if it

stops.



tomdean





------------------------------------------------------------------------------

AppSumo Presents a FREE Video for the SourceForge Community by Eric

Ries, the creator of the Lean Startup Methodology on "Lean Startup

Secrets Revealed." This video shows you how to validate your ideas,

optimize your ideas and identify your business strategy.

http://p.sf.net/sfu/appsumosfdev2dev

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Bernd Blaauw
2011-07-18 20:54:33 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ralf A. Quint
It does not only take a(ny) packet driver for him to get working, it
would take additional software to deal with WEP/WPA encryption and
most importantly, the wireless setup and functionality like dealing
with SSID, channel, etc as well. That are all things that simply do
not apply in a wired setup...
DOS and packet drivers simply pre-date wireless networking, hence he
will simpy be SOL...
The DRDOS website has some networking info at:
http://www.unet.univie.ac.at/~a0503736/php/drdoswiki/index.php?n=Main.Network

that includes a few specific wireless cards, but I'm not sure which
interface is used (cardbus? pcmcia? some kind of pci-express? usb?).

For desktops it's relatively easy to get a network card for which a
packetdriver exists. Combine it with PowerLine adapters and you have a
relatively wireless solution.

I've not heared of anyone recently writing packet drivers for cards at
all, even with an open spec and opensource drivers.
Ulrich Hansen
2011-07-18 22:42:53 UTC
Permalink
Post by Bernd Blaauw
http://www.unet.univie.ac.at/~a0503736/php/drdoswiki/index.php?n=Main.Network
We also have something about DOS WiFi in our Wiki:
<http://sourceforge.net/apps/mediawiki/freedos/index.php?title=WiFi>

I never heard that anyone had a WiFi adapter working in DOS that was
faster than 11 Mbps (802.11b), sorry. But of course feel free to prove
it wrong.

I think the easiest way would be to use a wired network adapter or
indeed install FreeDOS in a virtual machine as Cordata suggested (if
your computer is powerful enough).

Have fun!
Uli

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